Les Voisins

It's you!

Louisa

Louisa

Je devrais sûrement dire que mon plus beau souvenir en France est la rencontre de mon mari dans un bar, deux semaines après mon arrivée à Paris! Si la rencontre de l'homme de ma vie est bien évidemment lié à mon déménagement à Paris, un de mes meilleurs souvenirs remonte à environ six mois après mon arrivée ici. Je faisais du velib' pour aller d'un bar à un club situé à l'autre bout de la ville. Il était minuit et nous rigolions très fort. C'est là que j'ai réalisé que j'avais énormément de chance de pouvoir vivre cette expérience et que le fait d'habiter à l'étranger allait m'ouvrir des portes et m'offrir de nombreuses opportunités.
-Louisa

Kristina 

Kristina 

My best experience in France was being a tour guide. After studying French and History in Paris for 3 years, it was my first post-university job. Although I was working on touristic sites that I had visited myself so many times before, introducing Paris to tourists was a great way of reliving my own first experiences of the city. Nevertheless, I have learned that sometimes you just have to go back home for British comfort food even if you live next to a Marks and Spencers in Paris.
-Kristina

Elizabeth

Elizabeth

My best memory is arriving in London as a young girl (I was 20) after having found a job, more than 35 years ago when French people were rare in that town...I only had a suitcase, and an address for a shared house... I must have been very brave ;-) When I was born my parents were working for the Duke and Duchess of Windsor in Paris, I guess Great-Britain and its history were part of my life from a very early age. Arriving in London was the fulfilment of a dream, without any doubt. My love story with the UK and the English started when I was very young and has never faded, even though I am nearly 58 years old. I must be one of the rare French persons who love everything about the British ;-) and most of all their sense of humour and the way they live their everyday lives.
-Elizabeth

Catherine 

Catherine 

I remember vividly the evening when I decided I would relocate to Paris. I was sitting on the banks of Canal Saint-Martin on a warm summer evening, hearing accents from all around the world, exchanging conversation over picnics of cheese and wine and being invited by strangers to join them. Having always wanted to live and work in France, I had the opportunity to join a law firm in Paris at age 24 and snapped up the chance to move to the city. The years that followed were the happiest of my life. I became fluent in French, explored the city's numerous (and delicious!) markets, drank in the rich culture of the many museums and galleries, went on weekend trips to ancient towns, relaxing beaches and vibrant cities. I always felt welcomed by the people I met, some of whom became lifelong friends.
-Catherine

Krystopher

Krystopher

When I lived in France, I was always the 'Scottish' or 'British' one when referred to by my French friends. Despite growing up in France, I truly identified with my British heritage, and my yearly visits to Scotland reinforced this feeling of belonging. On the other hand, never did I feel more French than when I moved to the UK. It was as if some invisible umbilical cord clung to me from the other side of the Channel. I'm now the 'French guy' in any social group, and feel a particular fondness for French language and culture whenever I remember my country or meet French people. I still appreciate the UK because it has a particular charm which I find both novel and deeply nostalgic. It's really a love brewed by contrast!
-Krystopher

Julien 

Julien 

I first came to London when I was 22, and I had no idea I would end up building my life here. I have now been living in London for 16 years. I met my British filmmaker wife at the Institut Francais, I was then working as programmer of the Ciné Lumière. It is a very romantic story but I am not going to give you the details here: just the fact that it's thanks to Catherine Deneuve that we met. I spent a lot of time promoting French cinema in the UK. Le Monde did a portrait of me in 2009 and the title was "The Ambassador of French Cinema". Although I am very French in spirit, with respect to certain traditions, I feel like I am a Londoner now. 20 years ago, I was immediately fascinated by this country and its people. The Beatles did the rest, and I fell in love with London. It's my place, and I still love it. Good bread is now the thing I miss the most.
-Julien

Rachel

Rachel

I have the privilege of meeting some very interesting people in my job from Presidents of France past and present, to film stars and the everyday people who make the country work. Organising the funeral for the policeman who was shot on the Champs Elysées earlier this year was one of the most rewarding things I’ve done. Without talking about the grass being greener on the other side, I’ve realised that England has a lot to offer on all fronts, whether it be landscape, culture, history to name but a few. I grew up in West Yorkshire, its moors, Bronte landscape and grit. I still miss it every day, but listen to BBC Radio Leeds everyday where my friend Liz Green presents her Breakfast Show.
-Rachel

Vivienne, voisin since 2014

Vivienne, voisin since 2014

I love the way French people greet everyone with'Bonjour' or shake hands in a bar, or say 'Bonjour Madame' in the supermarket. I like the pride the French have in their environment, lack of rubbish on the streets and their welcoming manner to their fetes and festivals. I liked the instant neighbourliness when I bought my first 'Maison Secondaire' (second home) and this has continued in the village where I now live.
-Vivienne

Sarah

Sarah

My best memory is the Tour de France coming past our house! From then on, I've always followed the Tour and the last two years I've cycled out to it from where I live with my younger brother who visits for it. This year I finished my ride at the top of the col de Ares with him, my son and two friends. Something I never dreamed I could do.
-Sarah

Michael 

Michael 

To get promoted at the restaurant where I worked in Paris, you needed to be bilingual or wait for the chef de rang to pop his clogs so I came to the UK to learn English. A recent great honour was being chosen to represent The Cook from The Canterbury Tales on the plinth of the new bronze statue of Chaucer in the middle of Canterbury. An anonymous customer paid £5,000 for this and I was shocked and delighted to be there for many many years to come.
-Michael

Michael

Michael

Swimming the Channel is without doubt one of the greatest challenges on the planet both mentally and physically. But you learn that very ordinary people can allow themselves to have the most incredible and unbelievable dreams and make them come true. Nothing great is easy, but very often it is possible. It is achievable and sport is a wonderful passport to friendships.
- Michael

Joanna

Joanna

I have lots of fond memories of France, which started with my parents bringing me to Paris for my 10th birthday. I remember being stunned by the beauty of the country. We came back every summer after that: fantastic memories of baguettes, pain au chocolat and sunny, sandy beaches!
- Joanna

Jessamy

Jessamy

I moved here just before the 2012 elections with my French boyfriend (now husband). We were at Solférino for the announcement of Hollande's win - I watched in amazement like an outsider looking in from the sidelines. 5 years, one wedding, 3 house moves, two children and another general election later, I feel like part of the gang!
- Jessamy

Chloe

Chloe

This is the third time I have moved back to Paris now. I may say it in jest to friends and family, but Paris seems to draw me back each time I leave. You can have days where everything seems grey, gloomy and you yourself play the role of a grumpy parisian, you "râle" it's raining, you're late, people are in your way, the metro is busy....but then you catch a little glimpse of Sacre Cœur in the distance, you turn a corner, forgetting you're near the Eiffel Tower and then get goosebumps when you see her.
- Chloe

Maud

Maud

I still don't understand why they drink tea with milk, but British are always happy to live life! Don't be afraid to meet all your team at 5pm in a pub.
- Maud

Aneeqa

Aneeqa

To be given the opportunity to move to the south of France and to work within an incredible ITER project in the field of fusion science was a dream come true for a young researcher like me . Living in Aix-en-Provence has been really exciting, and the fact that a cemetery from the 15-17th centuries was recently discovered outside my apartment, turning it into an archaeological site, is something that I am sure I will never forget.
- Aneeqa

Edward

Edward

In the early 80s, after I started work, I visited a friend in Paris for a week. Every day I took the bus along a beautiful tree-lined avenue with buildings built from stone. I imagined what it would be like to live there, never thinking it would ever be possible. Today, I live on that same avenue!
- Edward

Amélie

Amélie

I moved to London for the amazing energy the city has. You can feel it at every moment - the city literally resonates.
- Amélie

Kim

Kim

My most memorable experience in France has to be a 1000-mile road trip my wife (then girlfriend) and I took after we graduated. We surfed, camped and ate our way around Brittany, driving a 40-year old British Reliant Scimitar that could not have been less suitable. The heating permanently on, the car would only do 50mph on the autoroutes and we spent half our budget on fuel. But it was definitely worth it because everywhere we went, the French were eager to speak to us crazy Brits in our ridiculous car.
- Kim

Simon

Simon

Being a Brit in France one has the best of both worlds. My children, having been born here, love living in the French countryside and then hopping on the Eurostar to visit family back in London. Having gone through the excellent French schooling system up to the Bac, they will study at University in the U.K. Now that really is the best of both worlds.
- Simon

A leather craftsman, an umbrella restorer, and a cufflinks maker traveling from France to showcase their work at the London Craft Week.

Paul

Paul

It is my late father's experience that stays with me most. He was in hospital with a French man (Pierre). Neither of them spoke each other’s language but somehow they got along wonderfully and had a lot of laughs using a dictionary. When they both left the hospital they met every week and became very close. Pierre would bring gifts for my mum and when he became so ill that he couldn't leave his house he used catalogues to continue to send presents for us all. My father went to see him every week until Pierre passed away. Language and nationality separated them, but could not keep them apart.
- Paul

Alexandra

I moved to London after I graduated. I was then petrified to have to look for a job and start the 'serious', 'boring' part of my life. London provided the adventure playground I was looking for. A incredible, vibrant, tolerant, creative city. I initially set-off for two months with the aim to brush up on my English, and 20 years later, still haven't made it back.
- Alexandra

Bethan

Bethan

I moved because I fell in love with France, in the way that I'm in love with my home country of Wales. I moved because I couldn't stand a life that wouldn't be straddled between the two. Because when I travel across the Channel, either way, I'm going home.
- Bethan

Nicholas

Nicholas

When I left the UK at the age of 30, I could arguably have gone to the USA, Italy or the Middle East but chose Paris. I found myself on the steepest of learning curves but managed to survive, a feat of which I am proud. Integrating into a foreign culture is a process of self discovery. As for me, I have my Parisian wife, 4 children, my law practice, good friends and I am a truly settled. But I do admittedly miss great and inimitable English telly.
- Nicholas

Derek

Derek

Coming out of the Pont de Neuilly metro station in 1992 when I first moved here and realising that I was in a city of 10 million people and I knew no-one and that I was going to have to do something about it.
- Derek

Mercedes

Mercedes

Before I moved here I was incredibly nervous... I thought everyone would be proud and unhelpful. I couldn't have been more wrong. All the local people I've met have been kind and patient with me, coaching my terrible French. I realised I was basing my worries on stereotypes. I've made some wonderful friends – it doesn’t matter that some conversations are still basic...all you need is to share a laugh and a smile.
- Mercedes

Ekow

Ekow

My best memory in France was my first-ever invitation from a friend to his family's country house. It was the first time I spent a weekend away with just French people. And no phone signal – instead we just ate, drank, laughed, talked, played games - and had a great time.
- Ekow

Chloe

Chloe

One of my best memories of my life in France is when, a few years ago, I was at dinner with some French friends. Half way through, I realised that I was no longer translating from French to English in my head. It dawned on me that I was thinking in French – it was the most incredible moment! I wanted to cry I was so happy! It felt like one door had closed and a hundred more had opened. It just clicked, then and there and I felt as though I was finally becoming a true Parisienne.
- Chloe

Isabelle

Isabelle

My most influential experience about UK is music I have discovered, very young; with David Bowie for example and many others: this has guided me in my life and given me happiness, creativity and freedom, not to mention historical and artistic events – the UK is a kind of lighthouse!
- Isabelle

Sinead

Sinead

There is a huge emphasis on work/ life balance in France and the family is always priority, which appealed to us both. Oh and the food - did I mention the food?
- Sinead

Duncan

Duncan

It’s hard to look past the big moments that have moved the country. I arrived a few months before Hollande’s victory and I was there at Place de la Bastille that night. The optimism and exuberance was incredible! I was also here for the march after the Hebdo attacks. The solemn defiance of that day was awe-inspiring. It showed me that the French spirit of unity and freedom is as strong now as it’s ever been.
- Duncan

Tim

Tim

I’ve spent delightful springtime weeks exploring the rugged coast of Brittany, the rolling colza fields north of Paris, the Pyrenean mountainsides and the vineyards of Bordeaux, which is where I now live. Perched on the saddle of a bicycle is arguably the best way to visit France and to enjoy not only its wide open spaces, but also the countless small towns and villages that have managed to retain their own timeless heart and soul.
- Tim

Zoe

Zoe

The French love the Brits: they enjoy our culture, our Queen, our humour - and even sometimes, our food!
- Zoe

Janet

Janet

I've learned that the French do have some misconceptions, especially about English food - but after they've tasted my cooking and baking, they soon change their minds.
- Janet

Bethan

Bethan

When I started French lessons at the age of 11 in secondary school I was totally and utterly clueless. My parents were so desperate to help me scrape through my French O-level that they sent me on a French exchange. My French correspondent, Sophie, lived near Angers and we got on really well. Everything about France was so different and exotic - from the sign posts to the TV ads, from the pillow on the bed to the "carottes rapées" on my plate, from the socks people wore to the Orangina they drank. Needless to say, my French improved dramatically. As a result I got an “A” in my French O-level, continued to a degree in French, and ended up marrying a Frenchman and living in France - something my 11 year old self could never have imagined, and all thanks to that exchange.
- Bethan